Search
Make Good Use of Your Sidebar

Use this space for anything from simple blocks of text to powerful widgets, like our Twitter and Flickr widgets. Learn more.

To access Website Management, hit the 'esc' key or use this Login link.

Blog Index
The journal that this archive was targeting has been deleted. Please update your configuration.
Navigation

Resources

Following are some resources that relate to information contained in the chapters of The Haiti Experiment:


 

 

 

Smallholder Farmers Alliance

The Smallholder Farmers Alliance is a Haitian NGO co-founded by author Hugh Locke and agronomist Timote Georges. Supported by Timberland, the Smallholder Farmers Alliance creates agroforestry cooperatives that combine tree planting and sustainable agriculture to improve rural livelihoods, increase food crop yields and help restore the environment.


 

 

 

 

Yéle Haiti Program Activities 2007 – 2009

The programs run by Yéle in Haiti over the course of three years, 2007 to 2009. Written by Hugh Locke. Download as a pdf for free.

Download PDF – English (2.5 MB)


 

 

 

Yéle Haiti Programs – 2010

The programs of Yéle in Haiti following the January, 2010 earthquake. Written by Hugh Locke. Download as a pdf for free.

Download PDF – English (2MB)


Man of the Trees: Selected Writings of Richard St. Barbe Baker

This book, published by Ecology Action, distills the key messages of forester, author and environmentalist Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889–1982), drawing together extracts from eight of his published works. Here is an extract from the opening of Chapter 4 of The Haiti Experiment:

“Richard St. Barbe Baker, to whom I have dedicated this book, was an early mentor. I met this forester, author, and conservationist while I was a university student in London, England, in the late 1970s. He spent a lifetime helping to restore and maintain what he called “the green glory of the forests of the earth,” and he was a pioneer in taking forestry from the confines of a professional discipline to a movement that involved entire communities. With a lifetime of practical examples of work to choose from, it was his early experience in Africa that particularly inspired me. St. Barbe, as he was called by his friends and colleagues, had been assistant conservator of forests in Kenya in the early 1920s. Concerned that the colonial government of which he was a part was cutting down huge swaths of trees without any corresponding effort to reforest, he enlisted the native Kikuyu to form a volunteer tree planting organization that became known as the “Men of the Trees.” What set St. Barbe apart from other foresters was his ability to get the voluntary cooperation of local people by tapping into their culture. With the Kikuyu, that meant creating a secret society of tree planters who took part in a ritual dance initiation. Wearing full war regalia and carrying shields and spears, they pledged to serve as “forest scouts” by planting trees and protecting the forests.

From the moment I first set foot in Haiti, there was no question that, regardless of the initial focus of my work, it had to include a contribution to reforesting the country... “

Purchase “Man of the Trees” for $9.95